September 17, 2018

Curaçao Church Records from 1714 to 1831

One of the best resources in finding ancestry information on a family member has always been church records. Within a few lines, you can easily discover more about an ancestor than many times in public records. Church records are a great source to find out when an individual was born, the name of parents, the town or country their parents are from, and even at time locating grandparents information.

While I don’t read Dutch, it doesn’t mean that it should deter me or anyone else from finding records on an ancestor. The good thing is that there are plenty of tools out there that will help you along the way. The church records are in Dutch but remember that we have our trusty Google Translate and if that fails, then join Genealogy Translations on Facebook that will assist you with translating records, no matter the language. The following records are for a Roman Catholic Church in Curaçao named Saint Anna or Sint Anna. The records run from 1714 to 1831. The series is broken down as follows and are available online.

Baptisms (Dopen) 1727 - 1820

Marriages (Trouwen) 1714 - 1822

Deaths (Begraven 1769 - 1831)


There are Apostolic / Lutheran Church records available to review. They are as follows.

Baptisms (Dopen) 1795 - 1819

In addition, there are Jewish birth and death records available.

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September 14, 2018

Slave Records in Curacao 1831 to 1863


Just like many other regions throughout the Caribbean and South America, slavery existed on the ABC Islands that consists of Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao.  This post concentrates on Curacao and this is far from the only records. I will be posting them separately based on accessibility.  While the below the records are in Dutch, you can open another browser if on a PC and have Google Translate ready to enter information. All links within my posts always open to another window. I purposely set it up that way to keep the blog post available in case you need further instructions or want easy access to links on the page.

While Sephardic Jewish people were the first to settle on the island of Curaçao in 1651, they were not the only ones there. Unfortunately, Curaçao was also where the slave trade thrived in the Caribbean. As many of us know, slavery of Africans occurred throughout the globe but more so in the Americas. Many that were brought over from Africa were sold at the docks in Curaçao.  There was a slave revolt that occurred in 1795, which was led by Tula.  You can read about the revolt via the link I provided. I recommend that you also visit your local library or even search the web for more content on the history.

If you believe that you have found a record on your ancestor, whether enslaved or free, and find that Google Translate does not work, then I highly recommend that you visit Facebook, join the group Genealogy Translations and post the image, the direct link to the document, and the language you want to translate from and to.  There are instructions in the group on how to format your request. It is a very helpful group when it comes to translations.

To start with, in the series of the following records, you will find Roman Catholic Church records of enslaved African children that are being baptized. The records can only be accessed via a Family History Center which I have previously posted about. Visit the hyperlink to learn how to find these records locally to you.  There are other records available on the films such as death and citizenship records. The layout of what I provide below will be a little different than my usual posts as it is going to appear film based versus the type of record. 

Note that there are more records beyond the below that are available online that I do plan to post them on the website. So do not think that this is the end of what is available, it is just the beginning of many records but I need to start somewhere.


Film # 1949737 contains both Baptisms (Dopen) and Deaths (Overlijden) of the enslaved:
  • Slave Death Records: 1844 - 1852, 1848 - 1857, 1854 - 1861, and 1859 - 1863
  • Enslaved Children Baptisms: 1831 - 1837

Film # 1949738 contains Baptisms (Dopen) of Enslaved Children, Death (Overlijden) and Citizenship Index (Burgerschaps-Index) / Citizenship Register (Burgerschapsregister):
  • Enslaved Children Baptisms: 1837 - 1842 - Items 1 and 2 on the film
  • Slave Death Records: 1837 - 1842 and 1816 - 1820
  • Citizen Index / Register: 1831 - February 27, 1845

Film # 1949735 contains Births (Geboorten):
  • 1838 - 1842, 1840 - 1849, 1848 - 1852, and 1851

Film# 1949736 contains Births (Geboorten) and Deaths (Overlijden):
  • Enslaved Children Births: 1852-1857, 1854-1861, 1859-1862
  • Slave Death Records: 1838 - 1839, 1838 - 1842, 1840 - 1846, and 1844

Film# 1949737 contains Deaths (Overlijden):
  • 1844 - 1852, 1848 - 1857, 1854 - 1861, and 1859 - 1863

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September 2, 2018

Cap-Haitien Civil Birth Records 1827 to 1917

While in the 5th grade, I came home one day not happy in seeing a boy in the class being picked on due to his accent. His name was Adrienne, a triplet, but the only one of the three in my class. The reason he was being picked on was that he was Haitian. It was relentless for months because he let it be known that it bothered him and it bothered me.

While our neighborhood was poor to middle-class Black neighborhood, it was the beginning of an era where more people from the Caribbean started moving into the area. There were many of us in the area but the volume started increasing by the late 1970's.

I recall looking in my grandmother's set of encyclopedias and discovering that it was the neighboring country to the Dominican Republic as I wanted to know more about where the boy came from. It was just part of my curiosity and is still a part of me today. My grandmother noticing me digging through the books and proceeded to ask me what was I doing.

After explaining, my grandmother sat me down and explained that he was no different than me or anyone else.  She then proceeded to tell me how she would visit Cap-Haitien with her mother and my mother to shop in the 1940s. What really amazed me was years later, at age 19. I took my then boyfriend, now husband, who is Haitian to meet my grandmother. This woman all of a sudden breaks out and starts speaking in Haitian Creole. That was one detail she never shared with me, that she spoke 3 languages. Talk about being surprised!

Well, today these memories came back as I continue to look for online records and saw Cap-Haitien is online. Cap-Haitien, which was once called Cap-Français, was founded in 1670. There is plenty of history about the region that involves war and slavery.  I recommend you visit Slavery and Remembrance website to read up more on Cap-Français.

I never let my inability to read the language deter me from reaching my objective; sharing information. That being said, I am happy to say that there are more digitized records online for Haiti.  This post will concentrate on the digitized birth records currently available for viewing for Cap-Haitien in Haiti.  I hope that those who have family in this region will locate records of their ancestors.

Births 

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September 1, 2018

Dominica Land Records 1765 - 1927 Leads to Enslaved Ancestors

Many never look to land records to find ancestors.  The assumption is that their ancestors may not have owned land.  However, land records go beyond actual land and can include records of servitude such as indentured servants or enslaved people such as many of our African brothers and sisters; our ancestors. These records are invaluable in helping to piece together what our ancestors went through and hopefully leads to where on the African continent they came from.  It is unfortunate that our past is so hidden but hopefully it will lead to discovery.

As with all records for Dominica, these records are not available online.  However, you can access them at a local Family History Center (FHC).  Review my post on Finding a Family History Center for Free Research. The post will help you in locating a local place to view these records.

The following records go back as far as 1765.  Note that I have provided the film number with a link. You can easily open this post at a local FHC and click on them to access the films while there. All links will open in a new window on this website, popup blocker will need to be disabled for this website. Hopefully your ancestors are found in these records.

Film # 1699413 - Deeds and Indentures:
Register R1 1771 - 1772
Register P2 1775 - 1776
Register X2 1779 - 1783

Film # 1699427 - Deeds and Indentures:
Register D3 1787
Register F3 1789 - 1790
Register H3 1790 - 1791
Register M3 1794 - 1796
Register R 1800 - 1802
Register S3 1800 - 1801
Register Y3 1802

Film #1699539 - Deeds and indentures:
Register W3 1801 - 1802
Register Z3 1802 - 1803
Register N4 1811 - 1812
Register P4 1812 - 1814
Register A5 1819 - 1820
Register G5 1826 - 1827
Register I5 1830 - 1832 (Included are the triennial registries of slaves for 1817 - 1820 - 1823 - 1826)
Register N5 1835 - 1836

Film# 1699540 - Deeds and indentures:
Register P5 1837 - 1838
Register R5 1837 - 1838
Register T5 1839 - 1840
Register W5 1840 - 1841
Register X5 1841 - 1843
Register Z5 1845 - 1846

Film# 1699485 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers A6 - E6 1846 - 1853

Film# 1699486 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers F6 - K6 1853 - 1862

Film# 1699541 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers L6 - P6 1862 - 1873

Film# 1699620 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers Q6 - V6 1873 - 1884

Film# 1699621 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers W6 - Z6 1884 - 1902
Registers A7 - B7 1902 - 1907

Film# 1699690 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers C7 - H7 1907 - 1918

Film# 1699691 - Deeds and indentures:
Registers I7 - L7 1919 - 1927

Film# 1855349 - Deeds and indentures:
Book P1 1770 - 1771
Book P1 1796 - 1798
Book P3 1798 - 1799
Book P4 1813 - 1814
Book R3 1799
Book R4 1814 - 1827
Book D1 1772 - 1775
Book D2 1772 - 1773
Book D5 1823 - 1824
Book X1 1772, 1766 - 1769
Book A1 1788 - 1790

Film# 1855350 - Deeds and indentures:
Book B1 1765 - 1767
Book C1 1769 & 1773
Book E1 1775 - 1778; 1806 - 1808
Book H1 1784, 1803 - 1804
Book I1 1784 - 1786
Book K1 1769 - 1770
Book L1 1770
Book M1 1770

Film# 1855413 - Deeds and indentures:
Book M1 1790 - 1792
Book N1 1770 - 1771
Book O1 1770 - 1771
Book Q1 1771 - 1772
Book S1 1771, 1802 - 1804
Book T1 1771 - 1773, 1804 - 1806
Book V1 1771 - 1772, 1817 - 1818
Book N1 1792 - 1794

Film# 1855414 - Deeds and indentures:
Book Q1 1777 - 1781, 1798 - 1800
Book W1 1771 - 1772, 1809 - 1811
Book Y1 1772 - 1774, 1814 - 1815
Book Z1 1772, 1766 - 1768
Book A2 1772, 1816 - 1817
Book B1 1766 - 1769, 1772 - 1773

Film# 1855476 - Deeds and indentures:
Book C2 1772 - 1773
Book D2 1772 - 1774, 1821 - 1826
Book E2 1773 - 1774
Book G2 1840 - 1848
Book H2 1848 - 1853
Book I2 1773 - 1774
Book K2 1864 - 1875
Book N2 1774 - 1775
Book M2 1774 - 1775
Book Q2 1775 - 1776

Film# 1855477 - Deeds and indentures:
Book T2 1777 - 1781
Book Y2 1781 - 1784
Book Z2 1784
Book B3 1767 - 1768
Book C3 1786 - 1787
Book G3 1790
Book I3 1791 - 1792
Book K3 1792 - 1793
Book L3 1793 - 1794
Book N3 1795 - 1798

Film# 1855493 - Deeds and indentures:
Book O3 1797 - 1798
Book Q3 1799 - 1800
Book R3 1799
Book W3 1801 - 1802
Book X3 1811 - 1813
Book E4 1805 - 1806
Book F4 1806
Book G4 1806 - 1807
Book H4 1807 - 1808
Book I4 1808 - 1809
Book L4 1809 - 1811

Film# 1855494 - Deeds and indentures:
Books L4 - Q4 1809 - 1814
Book Q4 1818 - 1819
Book R4 1814 (l doc. 1827 at front)
Books S4 - Z4 1814 - 1819
Books C5 - D5 1821 - 1824

Film# 1855534 - Deeds and indentures:
Book F5 1824 - 1825
Book H5 1827 - 1829
Book K5 1832
Book L5 1832 - 1834
Book M5 1834 - 1835
Book S5 1838 - 1839
Book V5 1843 - 1845

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